60 Years of Impact

IRRI AND CGIAR

Savitri Mohapatra | 06 October 2011

Rice breeders in sub- Saharan Africa are an endangered species, according to Dr. Moussa Sié, Africa Rice Center (AfricaRice) senior scientist. “Since classical plant breeding is no longer fashionable, very few students are taking up this discipline,” he remarked. “Even the handful of rice breeders who are working in national programs today are generally above 45 years old.”


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ENVIRONMENTAFRICAAFRICARICE, INGER, GRISP

Gladys Ebron | 20 July 2015

The future of agriculture lies in the next generation of leaders who will face the tough challenges of poverty and hunger, limited natural resources, and the impact of climate change. Empowering young people to be catalysts of change can help solve many challenges in the future. Young scientists must play a leading role in such efforts to help shape a new image for modern agriculture.


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CLIMATE CHANGE & SUSTAINABILITY SOUTH ASIACSISA, USAID, BMGFTRAINING & EDUCATION

Liz Barona-Edra | 07 March 2013

By planting flowers around their rice paddies, women farmers in Vietnam are saving 42% on insect control costs.

The women, from Tien Giang Province, participated in training to learn how to keep their rice fields ecologically sound and balanced – by planting flowers around them, a practice called “ecological engineering.” The “friendly” insects and other organisms that live in this diverse vegetation around the rice fields help control rice pests such as the brown planthopper.


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SOCIAL EQUITYSOUTHEAST ASIAASIAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

Savitri Mohapatra | 17 May 2017

A smart mobile crop management tool is helping farmers in Africa optimize their production and profits and reduce waste.


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PROSPERITY AFRICADIGITAL AGRICULTURE

Gene Hettel | 01 May 2020

Darshan Singh Brar, a plant breeder at the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI; 1987–2011), devoted nearly a quarter century of dedicated service to the institute, which encompassed not only cutting-edge rice research but also administration, education, and support of national programs in developing countries.


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FOOD SECURITY & NUTRITIONSOUTHEAST ASIAIRRI ALUMNI

Savitri Mohapatra | 18 July 2008

“Everyone to the farm,” is the new decree of President Wade of Senegal—a country that has seen massive riots in the last few months, when thousands of citizens carrying empty rice sacks on their heads marched in protest against soaring rice prices. The President has just unveiled an ambitious agricultural plan called the Great Agricultural Offensive for Food and Abundance (GOANA), which aims to Abundance make Senegal self-sufficient in food staples, especially rice. GOANA’s target is to produce in the next season 500,000 tons of rice—2.5 times more than the current production.


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CLIMATE CHANGE & SUSTAINABILITY AFRICAAFRICARICE

Adriana Varón Molina | 20 March 2017

Diamond, Amber, Quartz, and Sapphire: this collection of “jewels” is not kept in a bank vault, but sown in the cold soils of Chile, the country hugging the southwestern coast of South America. These are some of the rice varieties (named after precious stones) that are grown in the country.


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FOOD SECURITY & NUTRITIONSOUTH AMERICACIAT

Savitri Mohapatra | 08 November 2018

In my 47-year international career (27 years at IRRI and 20 years at Virginia Tech), I must say that my time at IRRI as an agronomist from January 1964 to June 1992 (becoming head of agronomy in 1970), represented the best years of my life and the most rewarding scientific and professional career.


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ENVIRONMENTSOUTHEAST ASIAIRRI ALUMNI

Alaric Santiaguel | 20 October 2015

World Food Day is a day of action against hunger. Every year, on October 16, people around the world come together to declare their commitment to eradicate hunger in our lifetime. In the lead-up to this international event, the annual winner of the World Food Prize is feted in Des Moines, Iowa.


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PROSPERITYSOUTH ASIAIRRI ALUMNI

Sylvia O. Inciong | 24 September 2002

India is a world away from Indiana, and none would mistake Sister Sajita Isaac for Johnny Appleseed. But the peripatetic Catholic nun calls to mind the fabled nurseryman of the American frontier. Like John Chapman — to use the real name of the evangelist who roamed Indiana and Ohio for half a century raising apple seedlings to sustain homesteaders during their first difficult years — Sister Sajita brings missionary zeal to the earthly task of helping farmers improve their diets and livelihoods. And, like Chapman, she covers a lot of ground, riding her motorbike five days a week to villages up to 50 km away, and shifting her agricultural ministrations from village to village as improved crop varieties and farming practices take root.


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SOCIAL EQUITYSOUTH ASIAEXTENSION

Gene Hettel | 01 April 2015

The legendary Ebrahimali Abubacker Siddiq, 78, began his long and enduring rice research career in 1968 as a cytogeneticist at the Indian Agricultural Research Institute (IARI) in New Delhi, including 7 years there as a senior scientist. In 1983-86, he spent 3 years as a breeder for IRRI in Egypt. Returning to IARI, he was appointed professor of genetics (1986-87).


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CLIMATE CHANGE & SUSTAINABILITY SOUTH ASIAIRRI ALUMNI

Savitri Mohapatra | 12 April 2012

The excitement of rice farmers in Saint-Louis, Senegal, upon seeing an appropriate engine-driven small-scale thresher from Asia in the mid-1990s could not have been far different from that of the first American president, George Washington, in 1796, when he was expecting the first horse-powered threshing machine to arrive from London. He described the new machine as one of “the most valuable institutions in this country; for nothing is more wanting and to be wished for on our farms.”


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PROSPERITYAFRICAAFRICARICE

Sophie Clayton and Alaric Francis SantiagueL | 06 October 2011

Burundi is a small landlocked country in Central Africa.Longstanding tribal conflicts in the country broke out into a civil war in 1993 that lasted 12 years and resulted in more than 200,000 deaths. In 2006, a year after the conflict ended, a horrendous 83% of Burundians were found living below the international poverty standard of less than US$1.25 a day.


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SOCIAL EQUITYAFRICAUNITED NATIONS

Edgar Torres | 01 January 2015

The past 40 years have seen major advances in rice improvement for the unique and diverse growing conditions of Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). The Rice Program of CIAT has contributed greatly, working in collaboration with its many national partners.


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FOOD SECURITY & NUTRITIONCGIARCIAT

Rice Today | 09 April 2002

Rice farmers in China are at the forefront of a ten-year international scientific effort to reduce the amount of chemicals being dumped on the planet’s millions of hectares of rice paddies. As 13% of the world’s total harvested crop area is planted to rice, any success in helping rice farmers reduce the inappropriate use of pesticides promises to have a major impact on the environment, especially in Asia. The situation is of special concern in China, where the excessive use of farm chemicals has been a major problem for many years.


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ENVIRONMENTCHINAJIANGSU ACADEMY OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES