60 Years of Impact

A look back at the people, stories, and impact of IRRI, CGIAR, and its partners across the globe

Phetmanyseng Xangsayasane | 13 July 2016

In Lao PDR, more than 860,000 hectares of land are devoted to rice production, of which 760,951 hectares (88%) are composed of rainfed lowland rice. However, the rice industry experiences losses because of frequent floods that damage rice fields in the central region (10–29%) and across the country (8–21%). Floods usually occur from late August to late September.

The country is prone to drought, which damages and reduces yield from 10% to 50% in the central parts of the country. Drought occurs at any time during the growing season, with early drought in June to July, intermittent drought happening from August to September, and late drought in October.


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CLIMATE CHANGE & SUSTAINABILITYSOUTHEAST ASIA, LAO PDRCURE, ARC, XBFC, MAF

Astari Widya Dharma | 14 Septmeber 2017

Thailand’s Rice Department, Better Rice Initiative Asia (BRIA) Thailand, OLAM International, and Bayer Thai Co. Ltd. initiated pilot testing for the Sustainable Rice Platform (SRP) standard with farmer groups in Ubon Ratchathani Province in the northeast of the country. During pilot testing, farmers received benefits, including free training from experts, helping them to produce more sustainable rice, which will create a massive impact within the region. Moreover, the paddies have better grain quality since the farmers received close advisory support from the experts, including facilitating the organization of a harvesting plan with certain service providers for harvesting.


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PROSPERITYTHAILAND, SOUTHEAST ASIASRP, THAI RCE DEPT., BRIA, OLAM, BAYER, GIZ

Rice Today | 07 October 2020

The right storage container can bring multiple advantages for smallholder farmers and rice milling companies. The use of hermetic storage containers is a green alternative for the safe storage of paddy rice without the need for the application of pesticides.


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ENVIRONMENTPHILIPPINES, SCUTHEAST ASIAIRRI, GRAINSAFE

Arindam Samaddara, Rosa Paula Cuevasa, Marie Claire Custodio Jhoanne Ynion, Anindita Ray (Chakravart), Suva Kanta Mohanty, and Matty Demont | 11 January 2021

Planetary health diets are seen as the core vehicle for attaining the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement by 2050. These diets, low in animal-sourced food and composed mainly of plant-based food sources, require radically transforming global food systems through major paradigm shifts in dietary habits and diets. The success of adopting such planetary health diets, however, crucially hinges on people, and more specifically on their culture, context, socioeconomic status, food environment, attitudes, perceptions, beliefs, and behavior towards food choice.


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NUTRITION AND FOOD SECURITYEAST INDIA, SOUTH ASIAGSR

Sugandha Munshi, Ranjitha Puskur, Akhilesh Kumar, and Pranab Nayak | 15 February 2018

Women provide half of the labor in rice cultivation in India, according to the International Rice Research Institute ( IRRI) Farm Household Survey (2008-10). They do most of the tedious and backbreaking work in rice cultivation such as nursery raising, transplanting, weeding, harvesting, and threshing. In spite of their significant contributions, the women are only recognized as wives of farmers—not as farmers.

However, this image of rural women has begun to change in Munger in the eastern state of Bihar through the ITC Limited Social Investment Programme-Mission Sunehra Kal (Golden Future).


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SOCIAL EQUITYSCUTH ASIA, INDIAIRRI, CSISA, GOLDEN FUTURE

By Reianne Quilloy and Grant Singleton | 11 November 2020

Rice production currently faces many serious challenges such as climate change, reducing the environmental footprint of water use and pesticide use, labor shortages, and loss of highly productive agricultural land to increased urbanization and industrialization. These challenges come at a time when there is pressure to increase the intensity of rice production in lowland irrigated systems to meet the need to increase production by at least 50% to provide food security for the estimated 9 billion global population by 2050.


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ENVIRONMENTSCUTHEAST ASIASDC, CORIGARP-PRO, COMPASS

Gene Hettel | 22 January 2016

On a hot, breezy afternoon on 21 January 2016, an international gathering of agricultural scientists and development officials dedicated the Lloyd T. Evans Plant Growth Facility (PGF) on the campus of the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI). The opening of the USD 10 million state-of-the-art facility manifests IRRI’s commitment to better understand the effects of climate change on plant growth in the ongoing effort to achieve food and nutrition security for future generations across the globe.


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CLIMATE CHANGE & SUSTAINABILITYSOUTHEAST ASIA, PHILIPPINESACIAR

Women in Motion (GRiSP) | 22 Feb ruary 2016

Rural women in Bangladesh are responsible for most of the hard work in and around the homestead, yet their work is seldom recognized as part of agriculture. But a woman from a small village in Bangladesh is proving that she is capable of contributing to household food security through improved farming practices.


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SOCIAL EQUITYSCUTH ASIA, BANGLADESHCSISA, JOTI,

Negussie Zenna | 06 August 2015

Two new cold-tolerant varieties, FOFIFA 183 and FOFIFA 184, were released for the high-altitude rainfed lowland rice ecosystem through activities of the Africa Rice Center component of the Stress-tolerant Rice for Africa and South Asia (STRASA) project, which is funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, coordinated through the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), and implemented by the Africa-wide Rice Breeding Task Force.


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PROSPERITYAFRICA, MADAGASCARFOFIFA, AFRICA RICE, STRASA, BMGF

Savitri Mohapatra | 08 November 2016

Unknown to many, rice seed growers are quietly turning Anambé, Kolda region in southern Senegal into a valley of prosperity.

Thanks to an amazing synergy among all the stakeholders, subsistence farmers in Kolda have become prosperous in less than two years doing a booming business in quality seed. Also, Kolda has become for the first time a major hub for upland rice seed production in Senegal. This transformation is helping the country move faster towards the goal set by the government to achieve rice self-sufficiency by 2017.


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PROSPERITYAFRICA, SENEGALFEPROBA, AFRICA RICE, PNAR, USAID, NERICA, SODAGRI

Bianca Ferrer | 01 AprIL 2011

Dr. Peng joined the Agronomy, Plant Physiology, and Agroecology Division headed by Dr. Cassman. He worked closely with plant breeders such as World Food Prize Laureate Dr. Gurdev Khush (watch IRRI Pioneer Interviews–Challenges for IRRI: Gurdev Khush) on some projects that included improving the yield potential of rice. One of the most memorable projects he came across was a field trial of a new plant type material—an improved tropical japonica variety—in the dry season of 1994. He said the crop looked beautiful in the field and his whole team visited the field almost every day.


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NUTRITION AND FOOD SECURITYEAST ASIA, CHINAIRRI ALUMNI, UC DAVIS

Reianne Quilloy | 15 May 2020

Vietnam is one of the main rice-producing and exporting countries in Southeast Asia. Rice production in the country is continuously increasing due to the expansion of cropping areas and improved farming methods. Consequently, producing more rice means producing more rice straw as a byproduct.

In many rice-producing countries, burning is an easy and often practiced solution to clear the land of rice straw for the next crop. It is estimated that over 24 million tons of harvested rice straw are produced annually in the Mekong Delta.


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ENVIRONMENTSOUTHEAST AMERICA, VIETNAMCORIGAP, SDC, BMZ, CCAFS

Iris Bugayong | 25 August 2016

BOGOR, Indonesia, 15 August —A focus group discussion with key stakeholders was recently held to introduce the prototype of a seasonal climate prediction-based decision support system. The app, called WeRise-RR, is designed to improve rice-based cropping systems in Indonesia’s rainfed areas. The focus was on how to effectively disseminate the new technology by considering the viewpoint of farmers.

WeRise-RR is a new version of the web-based app originally developed in 2014. It provides rainfed rice farmers with crucial weather information such as the start and end of the rainy season and rainfall distribution. The app also gives farmers options on optimum sowing times, the variety to plant, and the timing of fertilizer application.


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CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABILITYSOUTHEAST ASIA, INDONESIAWERISE, ICALRRD, CCADS-RR

Eduardo Figueroa | 01 January 2013

Several factors influenced César Martínez’s lifelong devotion to rice. One was an early mentor’s enthusiasm for the staple grain. Another was the importance of rice in the diet of hundreds of millions of people. From these early impressions, Dr. Martínez formed a vision of what he could accomplish for poor households by becoming a rice breeder.

This vision has guided his productive career for 45 years. During most of this time, Dr. Martínez has worked as a rice breeder with the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), in Cali, Colombia, where he has served as Rice Program leader over the last four years.


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NUTRITION AND FOOD SECURITYSOUTH AMERICA, COLOMBIAIRRI ALUMNI, CIAT

Rice Today | 23 September 2020

Women serve as a cornerstone of food security. It is not only because of the strength of their numbers—about 43% of the global agricultural labor force, particularly in developing countries. Women contribute significantly to agriculture and rural enterprises that help reduce poverty in developing countries. If women in rural areas were given the same access to productive activities as men, agricultural and farming production would increase and feed approximately 150 million more people, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.


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SOCIAL EQUITYSCUTH ASIAFAO

Savitri Mohapatra | 29 October 2018

Under normal circumstances, balancing and walking on rice bunds are not too difficult even for city dwellers. But, during the rainy season, this requires some acrobatic skills. This was the experience of a project team that recently toured selected inland valleys (a type of seasonally flooded wetland) in Gagnoa, Côte d’Ivoire, to interact with farmers and understand their concerns. The visit underlined the value of maintaining balance in the inland valleys in more ways than one. Inland valleys provide many crucial services to rural communities.


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ENVIRONMENTAFRICA, COTE D'IVOIRECGIAR, AFRICARICE

Gelia T. Castillo | 24 April 2009

Rice is life. So, when the global rice crisis hit in 2008, it threatened many lives. The year became well remembered for the soaring prices, the long lines in the market, the panic, the blame game, and the social unrest in different countries. A sense of alarm grew when rice, known to be the most “affordable” food for the poor, suddenly became “unaffordable.” It reminded the world of rice’s crucial role in human existence. It also revived interest in agriculture.


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NUTRITION AND FOOD SECURITYSOUTHEAST ASIA, PHILIPPINESIRRI ALUMNI, CURE, SCUBA RICE

Rice Today | 28 August 2020

Women play a more important role in rice production in North and Central than in South Vietnam while young people find agriculture as an unattractive opportunity. These are among the findings in the study, A comparative analysis of gender and youth issues in rice production in North, Central, and South Vietnam, that have implications for formulating policies in disseminating CSA technologies.


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SOCIAL EQUITYSOUTHEAST ASIA, VIETNAMCSA, CCAFS

Nathan Russell | 01 October 2014

Climate action is what Colombian rice farmers desperately need, as seemingly crazy weather—subtle shifts in rainfall plus more extreme climate events—forces them to toss aside familiar assumptions on when and what to plant. In the last 5 years, emerging climate change impacts have already driven down yields of irrigated rice from an average of 6 tons per hectare to 5 tons, according to FEDEARROZ, the national rice growers association.


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CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABILITYSOUTH AMERICA, COLOMBIACGIAR, CIAT, FEDEARROZ

Ma. Aileen Garcia | 06 October 2011

Emma is a 38-year-old mother of eight from the Philippines. She earns a living as a cleaning lady, and putting food on the table is a challenge that she and her husband face each day.

For Emma and many other families in Asia, rice is the staple food, which eats up the family’s meager budget. “We depend on rice every day, because it is filling,” she said. “Most of the time, however, we cannot afford fish, meat, or vegetables. We only sprinkle salt or soy sauce to add some flavor or sometimes prepare rice as porridge.


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FOOD SECURITY AND NUTRITIONSOUTHEAST ASIA, PHILIPPINESGOLDEN RICE, FNRI

Lanie Reyes | 05 April 2017

The late Sir Fazle Hasan Abed, a man from a wealthy family, had a vision of reaching out to his countrymen. He sold his house in London and he and his like-minded friends raised funds to buy building materials for their homeless countrymen. His work, which he started with his colleagues in a remote region of northeastern Bangladesh, led to the nongovernment organization known today as BRAC.


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PROSPERITYSOUTH ASIA, BANGLADESHIRRI ALUMNI, BRAC

Roland J. Buresh | 10 September 2002

The most intensively cropped experimental site in Asia began four decades ago largely as a demonstration plot conveniently close to IRRI’s administrative buildings. Researchers recognized its potential as an outdoor laboratory, and today the Long-Term Continuous Cropping Experiment (LTCCE) is a treasure for researching the sustainable management of intensive irrigated rice ecosystems.


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CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABILITYSOUTHEAST ASIA, PHILIPPINESLTCCE

Rice Today | 20 April 2020

Inorganic fertilizer, particularly nitrogen, is one of the pillars of intensive rice agriculture. In fact, the increased use of fertilizer (along with modern rice varieties, irrigation, and mechanization) has resulted in a higher rate of productivity. However, over the years, it also created a belief that soils are unproductive without fertilizers and many farmers tend to overuse it. The excessive use of fertilizers has led to environmental pollution and contamination of water resources.


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ENVIRONMENTEAST ASIA, CHINA3CT, CHINESE MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE

Amitha Bentota | 18 February 2019

Nobody pushed me toward science.

From my childhood years, I had a willingness to complete the commitments for any opportunities given to me by my parents, teachers, relatives, or others. After my primary education and based on my performance in the entrance examination to a secondary school, I had an opportunity to enter the science stream of Thelijjawila Central College. Thelijjawila Central College is a leading school in the Matara District in Sri Lanka and I had a lot of fun and enthusiasm while learning about science.


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SOCIAL EQUITYSOUTH ASIA, SRI LANGKAIRRI ALUMNI, RRDI, DOA

Carlito Balingbing | 12 February 2020

Agricultural mechanization is crucial in attaining food security in Africa.

The Malabo Declaration on Accelerated Agricultural Growth and Transformation for Shared Prosperity and Improved Livelihoods states that suitable, reliable and affordable mechanization, among others, as intrinsic to doubling current agricultural productivity levels by the year 2025. It also has a prominent role in Agenda 2063 of the African Union. The Agenda cites agricultural modernization as a transformative tool for enabling the continent to feed itself and be a major player as a net food exporter.


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PROSPERITYAFRICA, BURUNDIFAO, PRODEMA

Savitri Mohapatra | 02 March 2016

“The potential is there, but you can’t eat potential.” This is one of the most memorable statements of Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Norman Borlaug. His remark would perfectly fit the case of the inland-valley lowlands in Africa, which are known to have high agricultural production potential, but have remained largely untapped until now.

However, with rapid population growth and climate change, inland valleys are increasingly being considered as the continent’s future food basket since they are generally more fertile than uplands and have higher water availability. They are particularly important for realizing Africa’s rice promise.


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PROSPERITYAFRICAMAFF, AFRICARICE,

Sophie Clayton and Paula Bianca Ferrer | 01 January 2013

Vietnam’s mighty Mekong Delta comprises nine river mouths that give it its local name, “Cuu Long,” or “nine dragons.” Every year, it supplies Vietnam with around 20 million tons of rice, which is about 50% of the country’s total production. But, the significance of the rice supply from the Mekong Delta goes beyond Vietnam’s own 91 million rice consumers.


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CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABILITYSOUTHEAST ASIACLUES, ACIAR, CSIRO, IWMI, GIZ

Thelma Paris/Women in Motion (GRiSP) | 22 February 2016

Rice is intertwined in the fabric of the lives of hundreds of millions of people living in rural areas in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Rice production provides staple food, livelihood, and income for poor rice-farming communities. Among poor rice-farming households, labor requirements are met by family members, male and female, and hired workers.

Gender relations and division of labor by gender vary by country, agroecosystem, socioeconomic status, cultural norms, degree of mechanization, market orientation (subsistence and commercialized), and availability of male labor. Women contribute at least half of total labor inputs in rice production in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa.


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SOCIAL EQUITYSOUTH ASIAGRISP, STRASA, CURE, CGIAR

Rice Today | 15 November 2020

In the 1950s, Asia is on the brink of famine. Food is scarce and millions of people are in danger of suffering from starvation. So, in 1960, IRRI was established with an urgent mission to develop a high-yielding rice variety. On 28 November 1966, IRRI released IR8, a rice variety dubbed by the media as the “miracle rice.” Ultimately, this first effective semidwarf variety would indeed change the food situation in Asia and beyond, kicking off what we now call the “first” Green Revolution.


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FOOD SECURITY & NUTRITIONASIAIR8, FORD FOUNDATION, ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION

Reianne Quilloy, Rica Joy Flor, and Rona Rojas-Azucena | 05 October 2015

Millions of Asian rice farmers struggle with low-quality grains, which are brought about by poor postharvest management, inappropriate technology, and a lack of understanding of the factors that affect rice quality. These problems result in a loss of potential income for farmers and lesser available rice in the market. The Learning Alliance (LA) is a way for actors in a rice value chain to work together and encourage cooperation to increase adoption of technologies, facilitate stronger partnerships, and use resources sustainably. Through LA, the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) facilitates a network of stakeholders in the context of improving rice postharvest management. The alliance in Myanmar, composed of farmers and IRRI’s local partners from the rice value chain, aimed to produce better-quality rice and sell it to larger markets. Before Myanmar, the method was also used in various Southeast Asian countries where value chain actors similarly sought to improve their country’s postharvest systems.


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PROSPERITYSOUTHEAST ASIALEARNING ALLIANCE, CORIGAP, ACIAR

Gene Hettel | 18 August 2018

Noel Magor spent the first 14 of his 24 years associated with IRRI in various projects in Bangladesh to improve that country’s rice production and the livelihood of its farmers. He followed with 10 years at headquarters leading the Training Center and enhancing the Rice Knowledge Bank to help prepare the next generation of scientists to meet future challenges.


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ENVIRONMENTSOUTHEAST ASIAIRRI ALUMNI

Savitri Mohapatra | 15 January 2007

It is said that if you want to be a good gardener you should always sow three seeds: one for the bugs, one for the weather, and one for yourself. But if you tell this to Seybou Lema, who produces and sells seeds of the New Rice for Africa (NERICA) in the West African country of Togo, he wouldn’t agree to waste even a single seed.

Seybou doesn’t want to be just a good farmer; he wants to be efficient as well because the happiness of his entire family depends on the quantity and quality of the NERICA seeds he produces. The NERICA varieties, which are bringing hope to millions of poor people in Africa, were developed by the Africa Rice Center (WARDA) and its partners.


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FOOD SECURITY & NUTRITIONAFRICAAFRICARICE

Samarendu Mohanty and Debdutt Behura | 01 January 2014

Swarna-Sub1 is the flood-tolerant version of the popular mega-variety Swarna (MTU 7029) in eastern India. It was developed by scientists from the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), evaluated and released in India by Central Rice research Institute (CRRI), and disseminated by IRRI in collaboration with the national agricultural research systems, government organizations, nongovernment organizations, and public and private seed companies in India. In the eastern state of Odisha, where Swarna occupies more than 30% of the total rice area, both the state and central government are distributing Swarna-Sub1 seeds through various schemes such as the National Food Security Mission and Bringing Green Revolution to Eastern India (BGREI).


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CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABILITYSOUTH ASIACENTRAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE

Gene Hettel | 07 May 2018

Roland Buresh, who spent 24 years at IRRI as a soil scientist, worked primarily on nutrient and crop management, first as a visiting scientist in a 7-year stint in 1984-91 and then again to stay as a senior scientist in 2000 and as a principal scientist from 2010. Add to this his stints as a soil scientist at the International Centre for Research in Agroforestry (now World Forestry Center) in Nairobi, Kenya, and the International Fertilizer Development Center in the U.S,, and this son of a Minnesota dairy farmer has, as he puts it, had a 40-year journey through the mud.


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ENVIRONMENTSOUTHEAST ASIAIRRI ALUMNI

Reianne Quilloy | 03 August 2020

Sustainable farming practices are at the center of food security and improved livelihoods. They are also the basis for research and development interventions, especially in rice-based ecosystems, which provide the staple food of most of Asia.

As one of Asia’s rice granaries, Myanmar aims to regain its past position as a huge contributor to regional and global food security through rice-based adaptive research for improving the productivity of diversified cropping systems.


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SOCIAL EQUITYSOUTHEAST ASIACORIGAP

Alaric Francis Santiaguel | 19 October 2020

For plant geneticist Luke Young and biologist Rory Hornby, the solution to the world’s food security is an audacious concept: sea farming or ocean agriculture that utilizes the natural mechanism of plants such as mangroves and seagrasses to live in a saltwater environment.


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ENVIRONMENTSOUTHEAST ASIAAGRISEA

Savitri Mohapatra | 01 April 2014

Uganda—widely known as “the pearl of Africa” for its exquisite natural beauty, diverse flora and fauna, and rich mosaic of cultures— is attracting attention today as a potential rice basket for eastern Africa.

Over the last few years, Uganda has been experiencing a remarkable rice boom supported by good farming practices, premium market prices, and favorable policies that have stimulated large private investment in the rice sector.


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FOOD SECURITY & NUTRITIONAFRICAAFRICARICE

Adriana Varón Molina | 01 AprIL 2015

There is one occasion that Brazilian farmer Geovano Parcianello never misses. Every year, he travels 503 kilometers from his farm in the municipality of Alegrete to the city of Cachoeirinha, where the most important rice experiment station in the state of Rio Grande do Sul is located. Being there with a thousand other rice growers gives Mr. Parcianello an opportunity to find out about new varieties, disease control measures, and options for crop rotation—knowledge he can apply on his own 900 hectares of rice.


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PROSPERITYLATIN AMERICACIAT, GRISP

Paula Bianca Ferrer | 11 September 2015

A team of scientists from the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) and the University of California Riverside recently published a study unlocking the secret to just how rice seeds might be able to survive when grown under water.


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CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABILITYSOUTHEAST ASIAUNIVERSIT OF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE, NATURE PLANTS

Savitri Mohapatra | 06 October 2011

Rice breeders in sub- Saharan Africa are an endangered species, according to Dr. Moussa Sié, Africa Rice Center (AfricaRice) senior scientist. “Since classical plant breeding is no longer fashionable, very few students are taking up this discipline,” he remarked. “Even the handful of rice breeders who are working in national programs today are generally above 45 years old.”


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ENVIRONMENTAFRICAAFRICARICE, INGER, GRISP

Susan McCouch | 26 April 2010

I ended up at IRRI in a quite roundabout way. I actually came into science late in my career. I had lived and traveled extensively in Latin America before coming back to the United States for graduate school. I had realized that my background in literature and history wasn’t going to give me the tools that I needed to find meaningful work in the developing world, which was one of the aspirations I had.


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SOCIAL EQUITYALUMNIRICE BREEDING

Gladys Ebron | 20 July 2015

The future of agriculture lies in the next generation of leaders who will face the tough challenges of poverty and hunger, limited natural resources, and the impact of climate change. Empowering young people to be catalysts of change can help solve many challenges in the future. Young scientists must play a leading role in such efforts to help shape a new image for modern agriculture.


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CLIMATE CHANGE & SUSTAINABILITY SOUTH ASIACSISA, USAID, BMGFTRAINING & EDUCATION

Liz Barona-Edra | 07 March 2013

By planting flowers around their rice paddies, women farmers in Vietnam are saving 42% on insect control costs.

The women, from Tien Giang Province, participated in training to learn how to keep their rice fields ecologically sound and balanced – by planting flowers around them, a practice called “ecological engineering.” The “friendly” insects and other organisms that live in this diverse vegetation around the rice fields help control rice pests such as the brown planthopper.


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SOCIAL EQUITYSOUTHEAST ASIAASIAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

Savitri Mohapatra | 17 May 2017

A smart mobile crop management tool is helping farmers in Africa optimize their production and profits and reduce waste.


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PROSPERITY AFRICADIGITAL AGRICULTURE

Gene Hettel | 01 May 2020

Darshan Singh Brar, a plant breeder at the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI; 1987–2011), devoted nearly a quarter century of dedicated service to the institute, which encompassed not only cutting-edge rice research but also administration, education, and support of national programs in developing countries.


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FOOD SECURITY & NUTRITIONSOUTHEAST ASIAIRRI ALUMNI

Savitri Mohapatra | 18 July 2008

“Everyone to the farm,” is the new decree of President Wade of Senegal—a country that has seen massive riots in the last few months, when thousands of citizens carrying empty rice sacks on their heads marched in protest against soaring rice prices. The President has just unveiled an ambitious agricultural plan called the Great Agricultural Offensive for Food and Abundance (GOANA), which aims to Abundance make Senegal self-sufficient in food staples, especially rice. GOANA’s target is to produce in the next season 500,000 tons of rice—2.5 times more than the current production.


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CLIMATE CHANGE & SUSTAINABILITY AFRICAAFRICARICE

Adriana Varón Molina | 20 March 2017

Diamond, Amber, Quartz, and Sapphire: this collection of “jewels” is not kept in a bank vault, but sown in the cold soils of Chile, the country hugging the southwestern coast of South America. These are some of the rice varieties (named after precious stones) that are grown in the country.


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FOOD SECURITY & NUTRITIONSOUTH AMERICACIAT

Savitri Mohapatra | 08 November 2018

In my 47-year international career (27 years at IRRI and 20 years at Virginia Tech), I must say that my time at IRRI as an agronomist from January 1964 to June 1992 (becoming head of agronomy in 1970), represented the best years of my life and the most rewarding scientific and professional career.


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ENVIRONMENTSOUTHEAST ASIAIRRI ALUMNI

Alaric Santiaguel | 20 October 2015

World Food Day is a day of action against hunger. Every year, on October 16, people around the world come together to declare their commitment to eradicate hunger in our lifetime. In the lead-up to this international event, the annual winner of the World Food Prize is feted in Des Moines, Iowa.


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PROSPERITYSOUTH ASIAIRRI ALUMNI

Sylvia O. Inciong | 24 September 2002

India is a world away from Indiana, and none would mistake Sister Sajita Isaac for Johnny Appleseed. But the peripatetic Catholic nun calls to mind the fabled nurseryman of the American frontier. Like John Chapman — to use the real name of the evangelist who roamed Indiana and Ohio for half a century raising apple seedlings to sustain homesteaders during their first difficult years — Sister Sajita brings missionary zeal to the earthly task of helping farmers improve their diets and livelihoods. And, like Chapman, she covers a lot of ground, riding her motorbike five days a week to villages up to 50 km away, and shifting her agricultural ministrations from village to village as improved crop varieties and farming practices take root.


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SOCIAL EQUITYSOUTH ASIAEXTENSION

Gene Hettel | 01 April 2015

The legendary Ebrahimali Abubacker Siddiq, 78, began his long and enduring rice research career in 1968 as a cytogeneticist at the Indian Agricultural Research Institute (IARI) in New Delhi, including 7 years there as a senior scientist. In 1983-86, he spent 3 years as a breeder for IRRI in Egypt. Returning to IARI, he was appointed professor of genetics (1986-87).


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CLIMATE CHANGE & SUSTAINABILITY SOUTH ASIAIRRI ALUMNI

Savitri Mohapatra | 12 April 2012

The excitement of rice farmers in Saint-Louis, Senegal, upon seeing an appropriate engine-driven small-scale thresher from Asia in the mid-1990s could not have been far different from that of the first American president, George Washington, in 1796, when he was expecting the first horse-powered threshing machine to arrive from London. He described the new machine as one of “the most valuable institutions in this country; for nothing is more wanting and to be wished for on our farms.”


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PROSPERITYAFRICAAFRICARICE

Sophie Clayton and Alaric Francis SantiagueL | 06 October 2011

Burundi is a small landlocked country in Central Africa.Longstanding tribal conflicts in the country broke out into a civil war in 1993 that lasted 12 years and resulted in more than 200,000 deaths. In 2006, a year after the conflict ended, a horrendous 83% of Burundians were found living below the international poverty standard of less than US$1.25 a day.


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SOCIAL EQUITYAFRICAUNITED NATIONS

Edgar Torres | 01 January 2015

The past 40 years have seen major advances in rice improvement for the unique and diverse growing conditions of Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). The Rice Program of CIAT has contributed greatly, working in collaboration with its many national partners.


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FOOD SECURITY & NUTRITIONCGIARCIAT

Rice Today | 09 April 2002

Rice farmers in China are at the forefront of a ten-year international scientific effort to reduce the amount of chemicals being dumped on the planet’s millions of hectares of rice paddies. As 13% of the world’s total harvested crop area is planted to rice, any success in helping rice farmers reduce the inappropriate use of pesticides promises to have a major impact on the environment, especially in Asia. The situation is of special concern in China, where the excessive use of farm chemicals has been a major problem for many years.


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ENVIRONMENTCHINAJIANGSU ACADEMY OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES